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FT Leadership Dialogues - London

How can Business Thrive in a De-globalised Environment?

London |
Speakers include:
Lionel Barber

Lionel Barber

Financial Times

John Gapper

John Gapper

Financial Times

Brooke Masters

Brooke Masters

Financial Times

Overview

Low growth, rising inequality, heavy migration flows, and a widening sense of political disenfranchisement – reflected by the success of the Brexit and Trump campaigns – are heralding a new age of de-globalisation, marked by populist policies that may significantly limit international trade and the free flow of labour and capital, with an as yet uncertain impact on the global economy.

What does this trend mean for business? What should the private sector do to boost activity in this environment, particularly given the additional challenges and opportunities around technological disruption? Can business and holders of capital play a broader role in helping to revive global economic growth?

On the afternoon of 17 May in London, the Financial Times will gather 30 + leading CEOs and influential thought leaders to discuss these issues in a closed-door meeting to be chaired by FT Editor Lionel Barber. Proceedings will begin at 2.15 pm and close with a drinks reception and dinner.

These exclusive conversations will be the first in a series of FT Leadership Dialogues to be held around the world, designed to engage participants in a deep exploration of the topics that are shaping the business agenda in the year ahead. Each Dialogue will be structured as three hours of peer-to-peer discussions followed by a high-level dinner. Special content will be produced before and after each event.

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fallback Add to my Calendar 05/17/2017 14:15:0005/17/2017 21:30:00falseFT Leadership Dialogues - LondonLow growth, rising inequality, heavy migration flows, and a widening sense of political disenfranchisement – reflected by the success of the Brexit and Trump campaigns – are heralding a new age of de-globalisation, marked by populist policies that may significantly limit international trade and the free flow of labour and capital, with an as yet uncertain impact on the global economy.What does this trend mean for business? What should the private sector do to boost activity in this environment, particularly given the additional challenges and opportunities around technological disruption? Can business and holders of capital play a broader role in helping to revive global economic growth?On the afternoon of 17 May in London, the Financial Times will gather 30 + leading CEOs and influential thought leaders to discuss these issues in a closed-door meeting to be chaired by FT Editor Lionel Barber. Proceedings will begin at 2.15 pm and close with a drinks reception and dinner.These exclusive conversations will be the first in a series of FT Leadership Dialogues to be held around the world, designed to engage participants in a deep exploration of the topics that are shaping the business agenda in the year ahead. Each Dialogue will be structured as three hours of peer-to-peer discussions followed by a high-level dinner. Special content will be produced before and after each event.FT-Leadership-Dialogues---London628b91b09315541f93c0931e5b11d599MM/DD/YYYY

Chair and Hosts (4)

Lionel Barber

Lionel Barber

Editor
Financial Times

Lionel Barber is the editor of the Financial Times. Since his appointment in 2005, Mr Barber has helped solidify the FT’s position as one of the first publishers to successfully transform itself into a multichannel news organisation. During his tenure, the FT has won numerous global prizes for its journalism, including Newspaper of the Year, Overseas Press Club, Gerald Loeb and Society of Publishers in Asia awards. He has co-written several books and has lectured widely on foreign policy, transatlantic relations, European security and monetary union in the US and Europe and appears regularly on TV and radio around the world. As editor, he has interviewed many of the world’s leaders in business and politics, including: US President Barack Obama, Chancellor Angela Merkel of Germany and President of Iran, Hassan Rouhani.

Mr Barber has received several distinguished awards, including the St George Society medal of honour and the Legion d’Honneur for his contribution to journalism in the transatlantic community. He serves on the Board of Trustees at the Tate and the Carnegie Corporation of New York.

John Gapper

John Gapper

Chief Business Commentator and Associate Editor
Financial Times

John Gapper is Chief Business Commentator and Associate Editor of the Financial Times. He writes an award-winning column on business, with a focus on finance, media and technology, and also contributes editorials and features, including regular Lunch with the FT interviews. Mr Gapper is one of the FT’s most senior and influential writers, having covered the financial and media industries, as well as employment issues, before taking up his current role in 2003. Between 2005 and 2012, he was based in the FT’s New York office, where he helped to lead its successful expansion in the US. He is the author of a novel, A Fatal Debt, a financial thriller published by Random House (2013), and co-author with Nick Denton of All That Glitters, and is working on a second. The winner of the 2013 Gerald Loeb award for commentary, he has received three annual Best in Business citations for his column from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers. In the UK, he was named best business columnist in the 2011 Comment Awards and gained the technology writer and best communicator awards in the Business Journalist of the Year awards. Mr Gapper won an open scholarship to Exeter College, Oxford University and was awarded a Harkness Fellowship to University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School. Before joining the FT in 1987, he trained as a journalist with Mirror Group Newspapers, working on papers including the Daily Mirror, Daily Mail and Daily Telegraph.

Brooke Masters

Brooke Masters

Assistant Editor and Companies Editor
Financial Times

Brooke Masters was appointed Companies Editor for the Financial Times in September 2013 and she became an Assistant Editor in March 2016. Previously she was the Chief Regulation Correspondent for the Financial Times, covering the UK Financial Services Authority and working with reporters around the world to cover global financial regulation and white- collar crime cases. Prior to this posting she was the City Correspondent covering banking, stockbroking and asset management with a secondary focus on London’s international competitiveness. Before that she wrote for the Lex column and served as a senior business reporter in the FT's New York office covering the intersection of law and business. From 2002 to 2006, Ms Masters reported on Wall Street and white-collar crime for the Washington Post and followed New York Attorney General Eliot Spitzer's various investigations. This led to her 2006 book, Spoiling for a Fight: The Rise of Eliot Spitzer, which was published in both hardback and paperback editions by Henry Holt. Ms Masters spent an additional 13 years at the Washington Post in Washington and Virginia, covering criminal justice, education, and politics. She has also written extensively about espionage, capital punishment and terrorism. Ms Masters graduated summa cum laude from Harvard University with a degree in History. She also earned a Master's of Science in Economic History with distinction from the London School of Economics.

Peter Spiegel

Peter Spiegel

News Editor
Financial Times

Peter Spiegel has been the FT's News Editor since May, and was previously Brussels Bureau Chief. He returned to the FT in 2010 after spending five years covering foreign policy and national security issues from Washington for the Wall Street Journal and the Los Angeles Times, focusing on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. He first joined the FT in 1999 covering business regulation and corporate crime in its Washington bureau, before spending four years covering military affairs and the defence industry in London and Washington.

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Discussion Topics

What are the forces of de-globalisation? How does the Brexit vote and the Trump presidency affect strategy in a global-facing business?
  

  • Digital disruption and its impact on the way organisations do business
  • Global economies are likely to face disappointing growth for the next 10 years. Technological advances have not necessarily resulted in greater productivity. How are businesses leveraging innovation to address this imbalance?
  • Collaborating with (vs. integrating) start-ups to ensure creativity, nimbleness and flexibility is not lost  
  • How can the UK remain a welcoming place for international technology companies in light of Brexit?
  • Technology and the enablement of interconnected / borderless economies: adopting the right corporate structure to benefit from this and a look at how organisations need to work together differently

 Unleashing the power of your workforce

  • Effectively addressing the needs of millennials: how can their differing outlook be incorporated into workforce management practices?
  • Ensuring the ‘gig economy’ trend, as well as AI and automation, are optimised to benefit – rather than threaten – jobs and society as a whole
  • What must business do to ensure de-globalisation policies do not lead to the loss of a global and diverse pool of talent?

The challenge of spending for the future: capital super-abundance and the threat from the short-term investor impatient for returns

  • How can business make the world a better place and help revive a low growth economy through investment?
  • Deploying capital for long-term profit and growth (as opposed to a short-sighted, quick returns policy): exploring the social impact of sustainability / green economy strategies and the role of business
  • Getting buy-in from short-term (activist) investors for longer-term plans

How can chief executives communicate positively to the market and their teams in a volatile environment? How do you generate positive energy?

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Agenda - 17th May

  • 2:15pm
    Registration and refreshments
  • 2:45pm
    Main Roundtable (all participants to contribute)
    • Current business priorities and the long-term strategies being put in place in a new age of de-globalisation and technological disruption
    • How can business make the world a better place and help revive a low growth economy through investment?
    • How can chief executives communicate positively to the market and their teams in a volatile environment? How do you generate positive energy?

    Moderator: Lionel Barber, Editor, Financial Times

  • 4:00pm
    Breakout meetings (coffee to be served in rooms)

    Breakout I – Doing business in a de-globalised environment

    Moderator: Peter Spiegel, News Editor, Financial Times

    • What are the forces of de-globalisation?

    • Geopolitics: how does Brexit, the Trump presidency and rising populism – and changing foreign policies - affect strategy in a global-facing business?

    • What should the private sector do to boost growth in a de-globalised environment?

     

    Breakout II –The challenge of spending for the future: capital super-abundance and the threat from the short-term investor impatient for returns

    Moderator: Brooke Masters, Companies Editor, Financial Times

    • Deploying capital for long-term profit and growth (as opposed to a short-sighted, quick returns policy): exploring the social impact of sustainability / green economy strategies and the role of business

    • Getting buy-in from short-term (activist) investors for longer-term plans

     

    Breakout III – The firm of the future

    Moderator: John Gapper, Associate Editor and Chief Business Commentator, Financial Times

    To what extent are processes, models and strategies being affected by artificial intelligence (AI), automation, innovation and technological disruption?

    • How are these trends affecting the workplace, the search for talent and the dynamics of leadership?

    • Technology and the enablement of interconnected / borderless economies: adopting the right corporate structure to benefit from this and a look at how organisations need to work together differently

    • Changing customer trends: Is brand presence through social media now more important than traditional product advertising and what impact is this having on how business communicates with millennials?

    • How is the relationship between business and society changing, generally?

    Cyber Security: To what extent is the growing vulnerability to cyber attack affecting competitiveness?

  • 5:15pm
    Break
  • 5:30pm
    Findings and summation

    Moderator:Lionel Barber, Editor, Financial Times

    John Gapper, Associate Editor and Chief Business Commentator, Financial Times

    Brooke Masters, Companies Editor, Financial Times

    Peter Spiegel, News Editor, Financial Times

  • 6:00pm
    Drinks reception
  • 6:30pm
    Dinner welcome remarks
  • 6:35pm
    Dinner
  • 7:30pm
    Keynote interview
  • 8:00pm
    Q&A
  • 8:15pm
    Dessert and coffee
  • 9:00pm
    Drinks at the bar/ carriages

Who Attends?

The Financial Times Leadership Dialogues series will convene leading CEOs from a range of sectors, along with influential policy-makers, economists and innovators, to discuss the issues shaping the business agenda in the year ahead.  Complimentary places are available to individuals who meet this criteria.

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Organiser (1)

Chaired by senior journalists from the Financial Times Group, the summits, conferences, awards and strategic forums organised by FT Live gather the world’s brightest minds and most influential decision-makers. Exclusive on-stage interviews, stimulating presentations and lively panel debates – available on multiple content platforms – provide the cutting-edge insights, unique personalities and peer audience engagement that have the power to transform finance, business, politics, society and culture. The Financial Times, one of the world’s leading business news organisations, is recognised internationally for its authority, integrity and accuracy. Providing essential news, comment, data and analysis for the global business community, the FT has a combined paid print and digital circulation of 780,000. Mobile is an increasingly important channel for the FT, driving almost half of total traffic.

Sponsor (1)

Bain & Company is the management consulting firm that the world's business leaders come to when they want results. Bain advises clients on strategy, operations, technology, organization, private equity and mergers and acquisition, developing practical insights that clients act on and transferring skills that make change stick. The firm aligns its incentives with clients by linking its fees to their results. Bain clients have outperformed the stock market 4 to 1. Founded in 1973, Bain has 53 offices in 34 countries, and its deep expertise and client roster cross every industry and economic sector. For more information visit: www.bain.com.

Venue

The Savoy (River Entrance)
Savoy Place
London WC2R 0BP

United Kingdom

Tel: + 44 (0) 20 7836 4343

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Contact Us

Claire Arpa
Speaking Opportunities
Financial Times
Mark Buller
Head of Commercial - Global Industries