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Innovation Dialogue 2: Innovation of culture and the skills agenda

London |
Speakers include:
Christophe Chazot

Christophe Chazot

HSBC

Rachel Manser

Rachel Manser

Linklaters

Margaret  Heffernan

Margaret Heffernan

CEO and Author

Overview

As enterprises harness more and more technology, their interoperability skills continue to improve. Where a few years ago the hype was on big data, now it’s on artificial intelligence and soon it may well be on augmented reality. What this shows is that the task of identifying advanced technology is becoming much less of a challenge as people’s experiences with it increase. What is a challenge now though is knowing how to change people’s culture so that the technology can thrive. People need to have the necessary skill sets and the companies need to know how to organise themselves.

The first challenge - the skills agenda - has potential to be the biggest restraint on technology growth. Without the necessary knowledge of safely and effectively controlling intelligent machines, the whole purpose of their existence will be lost and business goals will be unattainable. There needs to be a balance of technological chaos and technological control. So how can the supply of these skill sets be ensured? Will national public curriculums change enough, or will the future lie with private and specialised academies?

The second challenge - creating an innovation of culture - has already created conflicting opinion. Many would argue that as innovation is the pace at which a company can transform, smaller companies have the advantage. But can they flourish for the long term? Too often they are bought and acquired by larger institutions who are attracted to those very ‘flexible’ benefits that smaller companies have. So again, this links back to the question of ‘how does a company organise itself to allow for innovation to flow through it’s culture, no matter the size of its operations?’

The FT Innovation Dialogue: Innovation of culture and the skills agenda will bring together pioneers of corporate strategy and transformation to bring to light the real truth behind the word ‘innovation’ and how arguably it is more related to culture and people than it is to technology.

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fallback Add to my Calendar 11/28/2017 08:30:0011/28/2017 14:00:00trueInnovation Dialogue 2: Innovation of culture and the skills agendaAs enterprises harness more and more technology, their interoperability skills continue to improve. Where a few years ago the hype was on big data, now it’s on artificial intelligence and soon it may well be on augmented reality. What this shows is that the task of identifying advanced technology is becoming much less of a challenge as people’s experiences with it increase. What is a challenge now though is knowing how to change people’s culture so that the technology can thrive. People need to have the necessary skill sets and the companies need to know how to organise themselves.The first challenge - the skills agenda - has potential to be the biggest restraint on technology growth. Without the necessary knowledge of safely and effectively controlling intelligent machines, the whole purpose of their existence will be lost and business goals will be unattainable. There needs to be a balance of technological chaos and technological control. So how can the supply of these skill sets be ensured? Will national public curriculums change enough, or will the future lie with private and specialised academies?The second challenge - creating an innovation of culture - has already created conflicting opinion. Many would argue that as innovation is the pace at which a company can transform, smaller companies have the advantage. But can they flourish for the long term? Too often they are bought and acquired by larger institutions who are attracted to those very ‘flexible’ benefits that smaller companies have. So again, this links back to the question of ‘how does a company organise itself to allow for innovation to flow through it’s culture, no matter the size of its operations?’The FT Innovation Dialogue: Innovation of culture and the skills agenda will bring together pioneers of corporate strategy and transformation to bring to light the real truth behind the word ‘innovation’ and how arguably it is more related to culture and people than it is to technology.Innovation-Dialogue-2:-Innovation-of-culture-and-the-skills-agenda6a63572b13397677f408d29c66ca9472MM/DD/YYYY

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Agenda - 28th Nov

  • 8:30am
    Registration and welcome reception
  • 9:30am
    Chairs' opening remarks

    Andrew Hill, Associate Editor and Management Editor, Financial Times

  • 9:35am
    KEYNOTE ADDRESS & INTERVIEW

    Tunde Olanrewaju, Senior Partner, McKinsey & Company

    Interview with Andrew Hill, Associate Editor and Management Editor, Financial Times 

  • 10:05am
    PANEL DISCUSSION - SKILLS

    The skills agenda has potential to become one of the biggest restraints on technology growth. Without the necessary knowledge of safely and effectively controlling intelligent machines, the whole purpose of their existence will be lost and business goals will end up out of reach. In this discussion, we will examine the need to maintain the tricky balance between technological chaos and technological control. And we will ask:

    • How can the supply of these skill sets be ensured?
    • Will national public curriculums change enough, or will the future lie with private and specialised academies?
    • How can companies identify the skills’ agenda required for the future, and not just for the present, in order to keep up with the pace of technological progression?

    Christophe Chazot, Group Head of Innovation, HSBC (in sabbatical*)

    (*until February 2018 to write a book on the transformation of the financial system)

    Alison Wall, Associate Director on Building Leadership, Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC)
    Louise Herring, Partner, McKinsey & Company

    Moderated by Andrew Hill, Associate Editor and Management Editor, Financial Times

  • 10:50am
    Break
  • 11:15am
    PANEL DISCUSSION - CULTURE

    Creating an innovation of culture has already created conflicting opinion. Many would argue that as innovation is the pace at which a company can transform, smaller companies have the advantage. But can they flourish for the long term? Too often they are bought and acquired by larger institutions who are attracted to those very ‘flexible’ benefits that smaller companies have. In this discussion, our panel will look, amongst other things, at:

    • How a company - big or small - can organise itself to best facilitate innovation flow
    • Do smaller enterprises really have the edge when it comes to creating innovative working environments?

    Rob van Leen, Chief Innovation Officer and Member of the Executive Committee, Royal DSM
    Rich Walker, Managing Director, Shadow Robotics
    Margaret Heffernan, entrepreneur, Chief Executive and author, Willful Blindness (Simon&Schuster 2014)
    Rachel Manser, Global Head of Knowledge & Learning, Linklaters

    Moderated by John Thornhill, Innovation Editor, Financial Times

  • 12:10pm
    KEYNOTE CONVERSATION

    Cindy Rose, CEO, Microsoft, UK in conversation with John Thornhill, Innovation Editor, Financial Times

  • 12:30pm
    Chair’s closing remarks

    John Thornhill, Innovation Editor, Financial Times

  • 12:40pm
    Networking lunch

TESTIMONIALS

"I came away with some good ideas about what to do in my own organisation and some effective ways to think about communicating the change agenda."

Dr Mel Walker, Otsuka

"Short, sharp, engaging  and very relevant sessions - a delight to attend."

Riaz ShahAshridge Executive Education

"Thought-provoking and inspiring insights from great speakers. A morning well spent, with takeaways that will last much longer and can be applied immediately."

Grace Baynes, Springer Nature

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Speakers (9)

Christophe Chazot

Christophe Chazot

Group Head of Innovation
HSBC

Christophe Chazot is Group Head of Innovation for HSBC. He leads Strategic Innovation Investment, responsible for investing in disruptive companies; Innovation Strategy, responsible for identifying and analysing themes that are key to HSBC’s future; and the Innovation Centre which organises internal initiatives including incubation.

Mr Chazot has over 20 years of experience across all the major asset classes in Capital Markets. Prior to becoming Head of Strategy and Planning for Global Banking and Markets in HSBC in 2012, he worked as Co-Head of Global Equities and was made a member of the Global Markets Executive Committee in 2008. Mr Chazot was previously the Global Head of Equity Derivatives from 2005 to 2008. Prior to joining HSBC in 2005, he worked at Dresdner Kleinwort as the Global Head of Equity Derivatives; at Bankers Trust as the Global Head of Foreign Exchange Options; and at Barclays de Zoete Wedd as an interest rates swaps trader.

Mr Chazot’s interest in FinTech dates to 1987, when he founded Softinvest, a technology company specialising in financial services which developed the Topval Option pricing and visualisation software which was sold to the French Stock Exchange.

Mr Chazot holds a Master of Science in Technology and Policy from MIT. He is a graduate of the Ecole Polytechnique and the Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées. He is the author of Les Swaps: concepts et applications, which is rated 4.7 stars on Amazon.fr.

Rachel Manser

Rachel Manser

Global Head of Knowledge & Learning
Linklaters

With a background as a competition law specialist, Rachel Manser has always had an interest in how technology can support Knowledge Management (KM), in particular, how it can be used to make the lives of our lawyers easier, enabling us to constantly improve the quality of the service we offer to clients. She is now Global Head of Knowledge & Learning at Linklaters. Core areas of responsibility are: Knowledge technologies, Information & Research, KM and Professional Support Lawyers (policy & development).

More recently, she was also appointed Co-Head of Innovation, together with three fellow partners. Together, they are responsible for the firm’s strategic approach to Innovation and Efficiency, driving change across our global firm.

Margaret  Heffernan

Margaret Heffernan

Entrepreneur
CEO and Author

Dr. Margaret Heffernan produced programmes for the BBC for 13 years.  She then moved to the US where she spearheaded multimedia productions for Intuit, The Learning Company and Standard&Poors. She was Chief Executive of InfoMatio Corporation, ZineZone Corporation and then iCast Corporation, was named one of the “Top 25” by Streaming Media magazine and one of the “Top 100 Media Executives” by The Hollywood Reporter.  

Margaret now blogs regularly for Inc.and the Huffington Post. Her third book, Willful Blindness : Why We Ignore the Obvious at our Peril was a finalist for the Financial Times Best Business Book Award 2011, and the book was named one of the most important business books of the last 10 years. In 2015, she was awarded the Transmission Prize for  A Bigger Prize: Why Competition isn’t Everything and How We Do Better, described as “meticulously researched…engagingly written…universally relevant and hard to fault.” Her TED talks have been seen by over three million people and in 2015 TED commissioned and published Beyond Measure: The Big Impact of Small Changes. She advises CEOs and senior executives of major organizations and is Lead Faculty for the Forward Institute’s Responsible Leadership Programme.

www.mheffernan.com

Louise Herring

Louise Herring

Partner
McKinsey & Company

Louise Herring is a Partner at McKinsey & Company’s London office and a leader of the Analytics and Digital practices. Her work focuses on retail and consumer facing companies in the UK and Europe, supporting clients as they transform to tackle both the challenges and opportunities created through digital and data. Recognising that true transformation takes more than landing a distinctive use case, Ms Herring focuses on building clients' analytical skills. She was recently appointed European lead for McKinsey's Analytics Academy, which supports organisations with their capability building so that they can thrive by accelerating their talent advantage.

Rob  van Leen

Rob van Leen

Chief Innovation Officer
Royal DSM

Rob van Leen is Chief Innovation Officer and Member of the Executive Committee at Royal DSM. He leads the DSM Innovation Center, a unit that serves to accelerate and support innovation throughout DSM and to create new businesses outside the DSM’s current business scope.

Rob has been with DSM since 1987. Previous positions included Business Group Director of DSM Food Specialties, Business Unit Director of DSM Dairy Ingredients and Technology Director of R&D at DSM Food Specialties. He has a PhD in Mathematics and Physics from Nijmegen University and an MSc in Biologics from Utrecht University. Rob also holds an MBA degree from Nyenrode University. 

Tunde  Olanrewaju

Tunde Olanrewaju

Senior Partner
McKinsey & Company

Tunde Olanrewaju leads Digital McKinsey in the United Kingdom. He serves major financial institutions and social-sector organisations on issues of strategy, organisation, operations, and technology.

In one recent project, Mr Olanrewaju helped a major bank shape a design-led reimagination of its customer journeys, including account opening and loan origination. Using an iterative design approach that observed how customers interacted with online and physical channels, he helped create digitally enabled experiences as intuitive and simple as the world’s best apps. The impact included cutting the average time for account opening to 12 minutes from one hour.

He also worked with the board of a large UK company to review the performance and viability of one of its subsidiaries, which was leveraging unique technology to compete in the foreign-exchange space. He conducted a deep review of the economics and technical capabilities of the business, along with comprehensive analysis of the market and competitive context, consultation with investors, and framing of strategic options. He also counseled the board on the best path forward, which included changes to the ownership structure and focus of the subsidiary.

Cindy  Rose

Cindy Rose

CEO & Area Vice President
Microsoft UK

Cindy Rose was appointed Microsoft UK CEO & Area Vice President in July 2016. In this role, she is responsible for all of Microsoft’s product, service and support offerings across the United Kingdom, continuing the company’s transformation into the leading productivity and platform company for the mobile-first, cloud-first era.

Prior to joining Microsoft, Cindy was Managing Director of the UK Consumer division at Vodafone where she led the expansion of its retail store estate from 350 to over 500 stores, and returned the business to growth after 12 consecutive quarters of revenue decline.

Before Vodafone, she was Executive Director of Digital Entertainment at Virgin Media where she managed the development and commercial deployment of Tivo and Virgin Media TV Anywhere. Before that, Cindy spent 15 years at The Walt Disney Company where she held a variety of roles including General Counsel for Disney EMEA and, ultimately, SVP & Managing Director of the Disney Interactive Media Group. In 2013, she joined the Board of Informa, a FTSE 100 publishing and events company, as an independent Non-Executive Director.

Cindy is a graduate of Columbia University and New York Law School.

Rich  Walker

Rich Walker

Managing Director
Shadow Robot Company

Rich Walker is the Managing Director of the Shadow Robot Company, and has spent years working in robotics. He leads the team at Shadow who are developing new robots and new applications for robotics. He is also active in developing and implementing European (FP7 and now Horizon 2020) and TSB/Innovate UK projects and also provides consulting in that area. Rich sits on the Innovate UK “Robotics and Autonomous Systems” SIG Advisory Board, which allows him to influence the direction the UK takes in robotics in a way that makes sense to SMEs and innovators; he's also a Director of EuRobotics, and sits on various EPSRC and University networks and committees around robotics.

Alison  Wall

Alison Wall

Associate Director
EPSRC, Building Leadership

Alison Wall is a member of the EPSRC Leadership team, with responsibility for the Building Leadership strategy which sets out EPSRC’s aspiration to invest in people with leadership potential at all career stages so they can make the maximum contribution, whether that be to universities, business, government or other research organisations.

All the Research Councils, Innovate UK and part of HEFCE, Research England, will come together to form UK Research and Innovation in April 2018. Equality, Diversity and Inclusion is high on the agenda for UKRI. Alison is leading the E, D and I workstream in the UKRI Programme, to build on the partner Council’s current work to develop ambitious plans for UKRI and to embed E, D and I in all the UKRI does. 

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CHAIR (2)

John Thornhill

John Thornhill

Innovation Editor
Financial Times

John Thornhill was appointed Innovation Editor in February 2016 with a brief to deepen the FT’s coverage of technology and write a regular column on its impact on our economies, societies, and lives. For the previous seven years he was deputy editor and news editor helping to steer the FT’s global news agenda.

Since joining the FT in 1988 as a graduate trainee, Mr Thornhill has also worked as the Europe edition editor, Paris bureau chief, world news editor, Asia editor, Moscow bureau chief, Lex columnist and companies reporter.

Mr Thornhill founded and runs the FT's 125 executive forum, which holds monthly meetings for senior executives from a range of industries. Previous speakers have included Bill Gates, Jack Dorsey, Ana Botin, and Mark Carney. He also hosts FT Tech Tonic, a weekly podcast on the impact of technology

Andrew Hill

Andrew Hill

Associate Editor and Management Editor
Financial Times

Andrew Hill is an Associate Editor and Management Editor. He writes a weekly column on business, strategy and leadership, as well as contributing longer features, videos and podcasts.

Since joining the FT in 1988, Andrew has worked in various roles, including editor of the daily Lombard column on British business and finance, Financial Editor, Comment & Analysis Editor, New York Bureau Chief, Foreign News Editor, and correspondent in Brussels and Milan. He is a member of the FT’s Editorial Board.

Andrew was named Business Commentator of the Year 2016 in the Editorial Intelligence Comment. He is the author of Leadership in the Headlines (2016) and Ruskinland (due out in 2019), an exploration of the thinker John Ruskin’s life, work and influence.

Venue

The Institute of Engineering and Technology
2 Savoy Place
London WC2R 0BL

United Kingdom

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PRESENTED BY (1)

The Financial Times is one of the world’s leading business news organisations, recognised internationally for its authority, integrity and accuracy. In 2016 the FT passed a significant milestone in its digital transformation as digital and services revenues overtook print revenues for the first time. The FT has a combined paid print and digital circulation of more than 910,000 and makes 60% of revenues from its journalism.

KNOWLEDGE PARTNER (1)

McKinsey & Company is a global management consulting firm, deeply committed to helping institutions in the private, public, and social sectors achieve lasting success. For over 90 years, our primary objective has been to serve as our clients' most trusted external advisor. With consultants in over 120 cities in more than 60 countries, across industries and functions, we bring unparalleled expertise to clients anywhere in the world. We work closely with teams at all levels of an organisation to shape winning strategies, mobilise for change, build capabilities and drive successful execution.

The McKinsey Center for Future Mobility was created to help business leaders and policy makers come to terms with a future that is increasingly autonomous, connected, electrified, and shared. Based in four global hubs (Beijing, Detroit, Munich, and Silicon Valley), our forward-thinking and integrated perspective, industry expertise, proprietary research, and global convening power give us a unique combination of assets to help clients navigate the mobility revolution.

LEGAL PARTNER (1)

Linklaters is a leading global law firm, supporting clients in achieving their strategies wherever they do business. We use our expertise and resources to help clients pursue opportunities and manage risk across emerging and developed markets around the world. Linklaters has offices in 30 major business and financial centres in 20 countries. Linklaters is recognised as a market leader on energy and‎ infrastructure transactions and our experts regularly support leading developers, investors, finance providers and governments ‎with a deep knowledge and understanding of the most important issues affecting the sector.

SUPPORTING PARTNERS (1)

Founded in May of 2006, Innoget is a trusted global open innovation network for business people, startups, experts and the academic community to list, discover, and get unique online innovation collaboration opportunities around the world.

With a growing community of users and a world-class customer service, Innoget offers a simple and secure opportunity to make trustoworthy contacts and advance their innovation. Whether an investment opportunity in a Startup, a R&D funding project, a technology solution request, a Research & Development grant, or a patent for licensing, Innoget connects people from more than 180 countries to initiate collaboration projects with guaranteed protection of their Intellectual Property and Confidentiality.

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