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Legal

Enhancing Corporate Integrity

Stamping out misconduct and improving legal and regulatory compliance

Sydney, Australia |
Speakers include:
Anna  Bligh

Anna Bligh

Australian Banking Association

John  Knox

John Knox

Credit Suisse; and Chairman, Australian Financial Markets Association (AFMA)

Rob  Locke

Rob Locke

EY

Overview

Fraud, money laundering, misselling and other types of misconduct remain endemic in business. This is despite concerted efforts by law makers, rule makers and company executives themselves to clamp down on illegal and dishonest activity carried out within corporations.

Australia’s Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry uncovered wrongdoing on a massive scale. The causes? “Too often, the answer seems to be greed – the pursuit of short term profit at the expense of basic standards of honesty,” the Commission said in its interim report.

It is a familiar problem in all industries, in all countries. According to EY’s 15th Global Fraud Survey of 2,550 executives working in multiple sectors in 55 countries, 11% of respondents had experienced a significant fraud in the last two years; and 33% said that bribery and corruption had occurred widely in business in their country. The consequences for companies of failing to prevent misconduct – or to comply with the laws, regulations, industry standards and internal policies designed to deal with it – are serious.

Clearly business leaders have to act. But how? The starting point must be to build a strong sense of corporate integrity. A company that adheres to sound principles of morality, ethics and honesty will be better placed to combat illegal and irregular conduct. It will also improve its business performance; integrity is not only about stopping what is bad for the company, it is also about promoting what is good.

The corporate integrity agenda should contain four elements: good governance; a culture focused on honesty; effective controls for managing fraud and compliance risk, enabled by the latest technology; and data insight, using predictive analytics, artificial intelligence and other innovative digital methods. Only by following a sound integrity agenda will companies bridge the gap between corporate intentions and actual behaviour.

This FT Briefing will look at the fraud, misconduct and compliance risks facing companies today. It will bring together general counsel, chief compliance officers, chief operating officers, chief risk officers, chief data officers and others from various industry sectors to discuss how best to manage these risks by enhancing corporate integrity.

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fallback Add to my Calendar 04/09/2019 17:00:0004/09/2019 21:00:00falseEnhancing Corporate IntegrityFraud, money laundering, misselling and other types of misconduct remain endemic in business. This is despite concerted efforts by law makers, rule makers and company executives themselves to clamp down on illegal and dishonest activity carried out within corporations.Australia’s Royal Commission into Misconduct in the Banking, Superannuation and Financial Services Industry uncovered wrongdoing on a massive scale. The causes? “Too often, the answer seems to be greed – the pursuit of short term profit at the expense of basic standards of honesty,” the Commission said in its interim report.It is a familiar problem in all industries, in all countries. According to EY’s 15th Global Fraud Survey of 2,550 executives working in multiple sectors in 55 countries, 11% of respondents had experienced a significant fraud in the last two years; and 33% said that bribery and corruption had occurred widely in business in their country. The consequences for companies of failing to prevent misconduct – or to comply with the laws, regulations, industry standards and internal policies designed to deal with it – are serious.Clearly business leaders have to act. But how? The starting point must be to build a strong sense of corporate integrity. A company that adheres to sound principles of morality, ethics and honesty will be better placed to combat illegal and irregular conduct. It will also improve its business performance; integrity is not only about stopping what is bad for the company, it is also about promoting what is good.The corporate integrity agenda should contain four elements: good governance; a culture focused on honesty; effective controls for managing fraud and compliance risk, enabled by the latest technology; and data insight, using predictive analytics, artificial intelligence and other innovative digital methods. Only by following a sound integrity agenda will companies bridge the gap between corporate intentions and actual behaviour.This FT Briefing will look at the fraud, misconduct and compliance risks facing companies today. It will bring together general counsel, chief compliance officers, chief operating officers, chief risk officers, chief data officers and others from various industry sectors to discuss how best to manage these risks by enhancing corporate integrity.Enhancing-Corporate-Integrity23c5e4f5d589154c0675c9ca22c1debcMM/DD/YYYY

Speakers (6)

Anna  Bligh

Anna Bligh

Chief Executive Officer
Australian Banking Association

As Chief Executive Officer of the Australian Banking Association, Anna Blight’s priorities include strengthening the culture in banking and delivering the right outcomes for customers. She has had a long and distinguished career in politics, and was the Premier of Queensland for almost five years until March 2012. She was also Deputy Premier and Treasurer of Queensland and held ministerial responsibilities in Education, Social Welfare, Arts, Economic and State Development and Infrastructure. Ms Bligh’s leadership came to national and international attention as she led the response and recovery effort to devastating floods in Queensland in January 2011.

Prior to joining the ABA, she was the CEO of YWCA NSW, a not-for-profit organisation striving to build a safer world for women and children with
programmess and services dedicated to ending domestic violence. In recognition of her eminent service to the Parliament of Queensland, and as an advocate for education, the role of women in public life and services to the not-for-profit sector, Ms Bligh received a Companion in the General Division of the Order of Australia award in the 2017 Australia Day Honours list. She holds Honorary Doctorates from the University of Queensland and Griffith University. She is a non-executive director of Medibank Private and Bangarra Dance Company.

John  Knox

John Knox

Chief Executive Officer Australia
Credit Suisse; and Chairman, Australian Financial Markets Association (AFMA)

John Knox is Chief Executive Officer of Credit Suisse Australia, based in Sydney. He has responsibility for the Investment Banking, Financing, Global Markets and Private Banking businesses across the country. Mr Knox joined Credit Suisse in Australia in 1995, before transferring to New York to work in Credit Suisse's Financial Sponsors Group in 1998. He returned to Australia in 2005 and became Co-Head of Investment Banking Department in Australia in 2007. He was appointed CEO Australia in 2015. He is also Chairman of the Australian Financial Markets Association (AFMA), Chairman of Cricket NSW and a member of the Business Council of Australia (BCA). He has a Bachelor of Commerce (with Honours) from The University of Melbourne. 

Rob  Locke

Rob Locke

Oceania Managing Partner, Forensic & Integrity Services
EY

Rob Locke is the Managing Partner of EY’s Oceania Forensic & Integrity Services practice. He is also the leader of Forensic Oceania financial services
practice. He is a highly experienced forensic professional with more than 25 years of law enforcement, investigation and fraud risk management
experience in both public and private sectors. 

Nick  Maginot

Nick Maginot

Oceania Forensic Data Analytics Lead Partner
EY

Nick Maginot is a Partner in EY’s Forensic & Integrity Services practice, where he leads the Forensic Data Analytics offering in Oceania. He has more than 10 years’ experience assisting global clients with matters relating to regulatory risk, investigations, litigation, and financial crime. He assists clients in addressing complex legal and compliance challenges through the use of data analytics and other emerging technologies.

Moira Saville

Moira Saville

Partner
King & Wood Mallesons

Moira Saville has been a partner in the Sydney office of law firm King & Wood Mallesons (KWM) since 2009.Her expertise in dispute resolution spansclass actions, regulatory investigations and inquiries and professional liability. Moira has a tremendous track record as a litigator resolving complex disputes and leading class action defences. She is a subject matter expert in corporations and financial services regulation. 

Elizabeth  Sheedy

Elizabeth Sheedy

Professor, Financial Risk Management
Macquarie University

Professor Elizabeth Sheedy is a risk management and governance expert based at the Macquarie Applied Finance Centre, Macquarie University. She spent her early career in the financial services sector before joining academia in the mid- 90s. At Macquarie she teaches in the highly-regarded Master of Applied Finance programme. Since 2012 her industry-relevant research has focused on risk culture, governance and remuneration in the context of financial institutions. She comments regularly in the media on the topic of financial services misconduct. 

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Chair (1)

Jamie Smyth

Jamie Smyth

Australia and Pacific Islands Correspondent
Financial Times

Jamie Smyth is the Financial Times’ Australia and Pacific Islands Correspondent. He covers economics, finance, business, and domestic, foreign and defence policy for the newspaper. He worked previously as Ireland Correspondent for the FT, where he focused on the Irish financial crisis and the peace process in Northern Ireland. Prior to that, he worked for The Irish Times newspaper as European correspondent based in Brussels, where he covered EU politics, social affairs, business and technology.

Agenda - 9th Apr

  • 5:00pm
    Registration and Networking Drinks
  • 6:15pm
    Welcome

    Jamie Smyth, Australia and Pacific Islands Correspondent, Financial Times

  • 6:20pm
    Opening remarks: Why companies are still failing to prevent fraud and meet their legal and regulatory obligations

    Rob Locke, Oceania Managing Partner, Forensic & Integrity Services, EY 

  • 6:30pm
    Keynote Address

    Anna Bligh, Chief Executive Officer, Australian Banking Association

  • 7:00pm
    Panel Discussion : Enhancing corporate integrity
    • The integrity risks
    • The legal and regulatory response
    • The interdependency between corporate culture and internal controls
    • The impact of digital disruption on legal and compliance functions

    John Knox, Chief Executive Officer Australia, Credit Suisse; and Chairman, Australian Financial Markets Association (AFMA)

    Nick Maginot, Oceania Forensic Data Analytics Lead Partner, EY

    Moira Saville, Partner, KWM

    Elizabeth Sheedy, Professor, Financial Risk Management, Macquarie University

    Moderator: Jamie Smyth, Australia and Pacific Islands Correspondent, Financial Times

  • 7:50pm
    Closing Remarks

    Jamie Smyth, Australia and Pacific Islands Correspondent, Financial Times

  • 8:00pm
    Buffet and Drinks
  • 9:00pm
    Event ends

Presented by (1)

Financial Times Live (FT Live) is the global conferences and events division of the Financial Times Group. Chaired by senior journalists from the Financial Times Group, the summits, conferences, awards and strategic forums organised by FT Live gather the world’s brightest minds and most influential decision-makers.

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The Financial Times is one of the world’s leading business news organisations, recognised internationally for its authority, integrity and accuracy. In 2016 the FT passed a significant milestone in its digital transformation as digital and services revenues overtook print revenues for the first time. The FT has a combined paid print and digital circulation of more than 910,000 and makes 60% of revenues from its journalism.

In association with (1)

About EY Forensic & Integrity Services

Dealing with complex issues of fraud, regulatory compliance and business disputes can detract from efforts to succeed. Better management of fraud risk and compliance exposure is a critical business priority — no matter the size or industry sector. With approximately 4,500 forensic professionals around the world, we will assemble the right multidisciplinary and culturally aligned team to work with you and your legal advisors. We work to give you the benefit of our broad sector experience, our deep subject-matter knowledge and the latest insights from our work worldwide.

Venue

Four Seasons Sydney
199 George St
The Rocks NSW 2000
Sydney

Australia

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Contact us

Ashley Li
Media Partner And Press Enquiries
Financial Times