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Enhancing Corporate Integrity

Stamping out misconduct and improving legal and regulatory compliance

Hong Kong |
Speakers include:
Ravi Mattu

Ravi Mattu

Financial Times

Overview

Fraud, money laundering, misselling and other types of misconduct remain endemic in business. This is despite concerted efforts by law makers, rule makers and company executives themselves to clamp down on illegal and dishonest activity carried out within corporations, in Greater China and other parts of Asia.

An indication of the seriousness of the problem was the decision last year by Hong Kong’s Securities and Futures Commission to add new features to its website to make it easier for the public to report suspected corporate fraud and market misconduct. Meanwhile, China’s financial regulators are considering tougher rules and stepping up enforcement action against offenders, according to recent press reports.

It is a serious problem in all industries around the world. According to EY’s 15th Global Fraud Survey of 2,550 executives working in multiple sectors in 55 countries, 11% of respondents had experienced a significant fraud in the last two years; and 33% said that bribery and corruption had occurred widely in business in their country. The consequences for companies of failing to prevent misconduct – or to comply with the laws, regulations, industry standards and internal policies designed to deal with it – are serious.

Clearly business leaders have to act. But how? The starting point must be to build a strong sense of corporate integrity. A company that adheres to sound principles of morality, ethics and honesty will be better placed to combat illegal and irregular conduct. It will also improve its business performance; integrity is not only about stopping what is bad for the company, it is also about promoting what is good.

The corporate integrity agenda should contain four elements: good governance; a culture focused on honesty; effective controls for managing fraud and compliance risk, enabled by the latest technology; and data insight, using predictive analytics, artificial intelligence and other innovative digital methods. Only by following a sound integrity agenda will companies bridge the gap between corporate intentions and actual behaviour.

This FT Roundtable will look at the fraud, misconduct and compliance risks facing companies today in Greater China and Asia generally. It will bring together general counsel, chief compliance officers, chief operating officers, chief risk officers, chief data officers and others from various the financial services, pharmaceuticals, energy and other industry sectors to discuss how best to manage these risks by enhancing corporate integrity.

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fallback Add to my Calendar 05/07/2019 17:45:0005/07/2019 20:30:00falseEnhancing Corporate IntegrityFraud, money laundering, misselling and other types of misconduct remain endemic in business. This is despite concerted efforts by law makers, rule makers and company executives themselves to clamp down on illegal and dishonest activity carried out within corporations, in Greater China and other parts of Asia.An indication of the seriousness of the problem was the decision last year by Hong Kong’s Securities and Futures Commission to add new features to its website to make it easier for the public to report suspected corporate fraud and market misconduct. Meanwhile, China’s financial regulators are considering tougher rules and stepping up enforcement action against offenders, according to recent press reports.It is a serious problem in all industries around the world. According to EY’s 15th Global Fraud Survey of 2,550 executives working in multiple sectors in 55 countries, 11% of respondents had experienced a significant fraud in the last two years; and 33% said that bribery and corruption had occurred widely in business in their country. The consequences for companies of failing to prevent misconduct – or to comply with the laws, regulations, industry standards and internal policies designed to deal with it – are serious.Clearly business leaders have to act. But how? The starting point must be to build a strong sense of corporate integrity. A company that adheres to sound principles of morality, ethics and honesty will be better placed to combat illegal and irregular conduct. It will also improve its business performance; integrity is not only about stopping what is bad for the company, it is also about promoting what is good.The corporate integrity agenda should contain four elements: good governance; a culture focused on honesty; effective controls for managing fraud and compliance risk, enabled by the latest technology; and data insight, using predictive analytics, artificial intelligence and other innovative digital methods. Only by following a sound integrity agenda will companies bridge the gap between corporate intentions and actual behaviour.This FT Roundtable will look at the fraud, misconduct and compliance risks facing companies today in Greater China and Asia generally. It will bring together general counsel, chief compliance officers, chief operating officers, chief risk officers, chief data officers and others from various the financial services, pharmaceuticals, energy and other industry sectors to discuss how best to manage these risks by enhancing corporate integrity.Enhancing-Corporate-Integrity92bc4145ce0d01af9590ba52d80a0744MM/DD/YYYY

Agenda - 7th May

  • 5:45pm
    Guests arrive and drinks served
  • 6:15pm
    Welcome

    Ravi Mattu, Deputy Asia News Editor, Financial Times

  • 6:25pm
    Opening remarks: Why companies are still failing to prevent fraud and meet their legal and regulatory obligations

    Jack Jia, Partner, Forensic & Integrity Services, Ernst & Young LLP

  • 6:35pm
    Roundtable Discussion : Enhancing corporate integrity
    • The integrity risks
    • The legal and regulatory response
    • The interdependency between corporate culture and internal controls
    • The impact of digital disruption on legal and compliance functions
  • 7:25pm
    Closing remarks

    Ravi Mattu, Deputy Asia News Editor, Financial Times

  • 7:30pm
    Buffet and networking drinks
  • 8:30pm
    Event ends

Chair (1)

Ravi Mattu

Ravi Mattu

Deputy Asia News Editor
Financial Times

Ravi Mattu is the Deputy Asia News editor of the Financial Times, helping to drive the paper's coverage across the region. Since joining the FT in 2000, he has held a number of senior positions at the FT including Tech Editor; Editorial Director of commercial department FT2; Business Life editor, overseeing the management section of the paper; Acting Editor and Deputy Editor of the FT Weekend Magazine; and editor of Special Reports (magazines and websites), during which time he edited a number of titles, including Mastering Management, and launched FT Wealth.

Ravi has interviewed leading CEOs, entrepreneurs and politicians, and is a frequent speaker and conference chair.

Presented by (1)

Financial Times Live (FT Live) is the global conferences and events division of the Financial Times Group. Chaired by senior journalists from the Financial Times Group, the summits, conferences, awards and strategic forums organised by FT Live gather the world’s brightest minds and most influential decision-makers.

Exclusive on-stage interviews, stimulating presentations and lively panel debates – available on multiple content platforms – provide the cutting-edge insights, unique personalities and peer audience engagement that have the power to transform finance, business, politics, society and culture.

The Financial Times is one of the world’s leading business news organisations, recognised internationally for its authority, integrity and accuracy. In 2016 the FT passed a significant milestone in its digital transformation as digital and services revenues overtook print revenues for the first time. The FT has a combined paid print and digital circulation of more than 910,000 and makes 60% of revenues from its journalism.

In association with (1)

About EY Forensic & Integrity Services

Dealing with complex issues of fraud, regulatory compliance and business disputes can detract from efforts to succeed. Better management of fraud risk and compliance exposure is a critical business priority — no matter the size or industry sector. With approximately 4,500 forensic professionals around the world, we will assemble the right multidisciplinary and culturally aligned team to work with you and your legal advisors. We work to give you the benefit of our broad sector experience, our deep subject-matter knowledge and the latest insights from our work worldwide.

Venue

Mandarin Oriental
5 Connaught Road Central
Hong Kong

Hong Kong


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Contact

Ruth Strachan
Content Executive
Financial Times