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Finance, Investment and Asset Management, Legal

Enhancing Corporate Integrity

A fresh approach to fraud prevention and regulatory compliance

London |
Speakers include:
Jonathan Guthrie

Jonathan Guthrie

Financial Times

Ian Dyson

Ian Dyson

City of London Police

Elizabeth Robertson

Elizabeth Robertson

Skadden

Overview

Fraud, bribery, corruption, money laundering and other types of criminal behaviour remain endemic in the business world. This is despite concerted efforts by law makers, rule makers, enforcement agencies and company executives themselves to clamp down on illegal and improper conduct carried out within, and against, corporations.

According to EY’s 15th Global Fraud Survey of 2,550 executives in 55 countries, 11% of respondents had experienced a significant fraud in the last two years; and 33% said that bribery and corruption had occurred widely in business in their country. The consequences for companies of failing to prevent such crimes – or to comply with the laws, regulations, industry standards and internal policies designed to deal with them – are serious. Aside from any direct financial loss, there is the risk of legal action leading to criminal prosecutions and large fines, regulatory sanctions, reputational damage and loss of customer trust. This in turn is likely to result in lower profits and reduced shareholder value.

Clearly companies have to do more to combat illicit activity. But where to begin? The starting point must be to build a strong sense of corporate integrity. A company that adheres to sound principles of morality, ethics and honesty will be better placed to combat illegal and irregular conduct. It will also improve its business performance; integrity is not only about stopping what is bad for the company, it is also about promoting what is good.
Accountability is another key imperative. It should be clear which people in which departments have responsibility for fraud prevention and compliance. The assurance functions – legal, compliance, finance internal audit and so on – frequently remain in silos and rarely, if ever, cross divides to discuss their respective roles or share insights. The IT department is often left out of discussions – a serious failing when most frauds and compliance breaches are carried out by people manipulating or overriding systems.

The corporate integrity agenda should contain four elements: good governance, with leaders setting the right example from the top and everyone knowing who is accountable for what; a culture focused on honesty; effective controls for managing fraud and compliance risk, enabled by the latest technology; and data insight, using predictive analytics, artificial intelligence and other innovative digital methods. Only by following a sound integrity agenda will companies bridge the gap between corporate intentions and actual behaviour.

This FT Briefing will look at the fraud and compliance risks facing companies today. It will bring together general counsel, chief compliance officers, chief operating officers, chief risk officers, chief data officers and others from various industry sectors to discuss how best to manage these risks by enhancing corporate integrity.

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fallback Add to my Calendar 05/21/2019 18:00:0305/21/2019 21:15:00falseEnhancing Corporate Integrity Fraud, bribery, corruption, money laundering and other types of criminal behaviour remain endemic in the business world. This is despite concerted efforts by law makers, rule makers, enforcement agencies and company executives themselves to clamp down on illegal and improper conduct carried out within, and against, corporations.According to EY’s 15th Global Fraud Survey of 2,550 executives in 55 countries, 11% of respondents had experienced a significant fraud in the last two years; and 33% said that bribery and corruption had occurred widely in business in their country. The consequences for companies of failing to prevent such crimes – or to comply with the laws, regulations, industry standards and internal policies designed to deal with them – are serious. Aside from any direct financial loss, there is the risk of legal action leading to criminal prosecutions and large fines, regulatory sanctions, reputational damage and loss of customer trust. This in turn is likely to result in lower profits and reduced shareholder value.Clearly companies have to do more to combat illicit activity. But where to begin? The starting point must be to build a strong sense of corporate integrity. A company that adheres to sound principles of morality, ethics and honesty will be better placed to combat illegal and irregular conduct. It will also improve its business performance; integrity is not only about stopping what is bad for the company, it is also about promoting what is good.Accountability is another key imperative. It should be clear which people in which departments have responsibility for fraud prevention and compliance. The assurance functions – legal, compliance, finance internal audit and so on – frequently remain in silos and rarely, if ever, cross divides to discuss their respective roles or share insights. The IT department is often left out of discussions – a serious failing when most frauds and compliance breaches are carried out by people manipulating or overriding systems.The corporate integrity agenda should contain four elements: good governance, with leaders setting the right example from the top and everyone knowing who is accountable for what; a culture focused on honesty; effective controls for managing fraud and compliance risk, enabled by the latest technology; and data insight, using predictive analytics, artificial intelligence and other innovative digital methods. Only by following a sound integrity agenda will companies bridge the gap between corporate intentions and actual behaviour.This FT Briefing will look at the fraud and compliance risks facing companies today. It will bring together general counsel, chief compliance officers, chief operating officers, chief risk officers, chief data officers and others from various industry sectors to discuss how best to manage these risks by enhancing corporate integrity.Enhancing-Corporate-Integrity-56423199b74213d1525a59845aa82a37MM/DD/YYYY

Chair (1)

Jonathan Guthrie

Jonathan Guthrie

Head of Lex Column
Financial Times

Jonathan Guthrie is the head of Lex, the Financial Times’s agenda-setting premium commentary service on companies and investment, and an associate editor of the FT. For six years he was City editor and writer of Lombard, an irreverent column on the Square Mile and corporate Britain. He has led investigations into Eurasian Natural Resources Corp, British Biotech and the “Gem of Tanzania” accounting fraud. Aside from Lex, he contributes regularly to House and Home and occasionally to FT Companies.

Speakers (6)

Ian Dyson

Ian Dyson

Commissioner
City of London Police

Ian Dyson was promoted to Commissioner of the City of London Police on 3 January 2016 and was awarded the Queen’s Police Medal in the New Year Honours 2016. He is the National Police Lead for Economic Crime, the National Police lead for Business Crime, and the National Police Lead for Information Technology within policing. Commissioner Dyson joined the Metropolitan Police in 1983, working in many different areas including crime and drug squads, vice and strategic planning.  For 11 years, he was a public order cadre trained senior officer and has extensive experience of commanding the policing of large public events. He then joined Surrey Police as Assistant Chief Constable in June 2008 overseeing some of the highest confidence levels in the country and improving neighbourhood policing.

He joined the City of London Police as Commander in September 2010 leading initially on organisational change, and later as the chief officer lead on economic crime, expanding the force’s national fraud responsibilities. He was also the National Police Lead for Contact Management and led the national roll out for the 101 non-emergency number. Two years later he was promoted to Assistant Commissioner leading cultural and business change, leadership and performance within the force, embedding staff empowerment and innovation. 

Elizabeth Robertson

Elizabeth Robertson

Partner, Government Enforcement and White Collar Crime
Skadden

Elizabeth Robertson is a partner in Skadden’s Government Enforcement and White Collar Crime practice, based in London. She has more than 20 years of
experience advising on multijurisdictional white collar crime cases involving allegations of fraud, corruption and money laundering, and on internal investigations. She regularly represents clients facing prosecution by the Serious Fraud Office, the Financial Conduct Authority and other regulatory agencies around the globe. Ms Robertson is ranked in the top tier in both The Legal 500 and Chambers UK, and was included in The Lawyer’s Hot 100 in 2013, a feature on the most influential people in the U.K. legal sector. Chambers UK describes her as “just fantastic. She has an exceptionally good touch with clients. She is the real deal.”

Andrew Gordon

Andrew Gordon

Global Leader, Forensic & Integrity Services
EY

Andrew Gordon is the Global Leader of EY Forensic & Integrity Services, based in London. He has over 25 years of experience working as a forensic accountant and is a fellow of the Institute of Chartered Accounts in England and Wales. He has undertaken complex UK and cross-border investigations for a range of clients across multiple sectors. He also advises clients on their integrity and regulatory compliance agendas. He has managed and led many complex and high-profile engagements including US Securities and Exchange Commission, US Department of Justice, UK Serious Fraud Office, UK Financial Conduct Authority and European Commission investigations in the UK, US, Asia-Pacific and Europe. 

Many of Andrew’s engagements in recent years have included the investigation and handling of sensitive matters and data in multi-jurisdictional investigations and the provision of remedial governance, controls and compliance advice in aerospace and defence, financial services, energy, oil and gas, mining, media, government, pharma, life sciences and healthcare. He was engaged by the former Mayor of London, Boris Johnson, as independent forensic accounting adviser to the Mayor’s Forensic Audit Panel. His advice resulted in the restructuring of the Greater London Authority and the disbandment of the London Development Authority. He also led investigations on behalf of both the Volcker and Eagleburger Commissions into Holocaust victims’ funds at, respectively, Swiss banks and European insurers.

More recently, Andrew has overseen investigations on behalf of the UK Government into the awarding of contracts and related sensitive issues including for the Ministry of Justice and the Ministry of Defence. He oversaw the investigation for the UK Government into MPs’ expenses. He speaks at various seminars and conferences and he has chaired the annual Corporate Accountability conference in London for over a decade. He has an honours degree in Business from Portsmouth University.

Philip Bramwell

Philip Bramwell

Group General Counsel
BAE Systems

Philip Bramwell joined BAE Systems as Group General Counsel in 2007. He has spent much of his career living and working overseas, undertaking major corporate transactions throughout Europe, the United States, Asia and the Middle East, specialising in mergers and acquisitions in the pharmaceuticals, IT and telecommunications industries. From 2001 to 2006 he was General Counsel and Secretary of O2, the mobile phone company. From 1998 to 2001 he was Chief Counsel, Mergers and Acquisitions for BT, prior to which he was European General Counsel the Atlanta, Georgia-based BellSouth Corporation. Philip started his career as an international corporate lawyer with SmithKline Beecham Pharmaceuticals. He was called to the English Bar in 1983.

Melissa Myatt

Melissa Myatt

Partner, Forensic & Integrity Services
EY

Melissa Myatt is a Partner in EY’s Forensic & Integrity Services practice responsible for leading the UK Business Integrity and Corporate Compliance team. This means that when a crisis, real or alleged, arises, she works with organisations to investigate what happened and help them answer the classic burning questions: how could this have happened without us knowing about it; and how do we discover and manage similar issues? Over the last 15 years, she has led projects in over 50 countries answering not only what went wrong but also why. She has worked with clients to develop a deep understanding of how their business operates, using data analytics to spot potential issues early. For example, she has: designed auditing and monitoring plans, protocols and templates to provide compliance departments with more efficient tools and processes to identify compliance risks; delivered training programmes on risk, compliance and audit; evaluated internal reporting mechanisms and response protocols for consistency and compliance with local regulations; advised on organisational structures and job descriptions for global compliance teams; and assisted with policy framework design and the drafting of compliance related policies and procedures.

Rahul Erik Saxena

Rahul Erik Saxena

Group Ethics & Compliance Officer
BP

Rahul Erik Saxena is the Group Ethics & Compliance Officer for BP and has worked as a lawyer, ethics and compliance professional for almost 30 years. The Ethics & Compliance function in BP is responsible for promoting BP’s values in the company – Safety, Respect, Excellence, Courage, One Team. The function has approximately 140 members and consists of several parts: trading compliance for the regulated trading and supply business (FCA, CFTC, FERC, Dodd Frank), central programmes (training, systems, policies), business facing advisory, management of the Speak Up hotline and internal investigations. Rahul worked extensively with the US Ethics Monitor appointed by the Department of Justice and Environmental Protection Agency for a five-year term as part of BP’s settlement with the US Government. He has worked in the energy industry for 20 years, mainly in commodity trading (numerous energy commodities including crude, refined products, gas, coal, carbon; as well as base metals, precious metals and softs) and is an M&A and regulatory lawyer by background.  He is qualified as a lawyer in Ontario, Canada and England & Wales and was educated in McGill University and the University of Toronto Faculty of Law.

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Agenda - 21st May

  • 6:00pm
    Guests Arrive
  • 6:30pm
    Welcome remarks

    Jonathan Guthrie, Head of Lex Column, Financial Times

  • 6:40pm
    Opening remarks: Why companies are still failing to prevent fraud and meet their legal and regulatory obligations

    Andrew Gordon, Global Leader, Forensic & Integrity Services, EY

  • 6:50pm
    Keynote Address

    Ian Dyson, Commissioner, City of London Police

  • 7:20pm
    Panel Discussion : Enhancing Corporate Integrity
    • The integrity risks. How serious are the fraud, bribery, corruption and other integrity risks facing large corporations today? How serious are the related risks of failing to comply with laws and regulations designed to combat fraud?
    • Room for improvement. How well do current fraud prevention and compliance monitoring strategies and techniques work, where are they failing and what new solutions need to be, or are being, tried? How do you improve accountability within the organisation, so that everyone knows who is responsible for what?
    • The interdependency between corporate culture and internal controls. Will more and tighter controls help strengthen the culture of integrity? Are there other ways to boost the integrity culture besides controls?
    • The impact of digital disruption on legal and compliance functions. Can technology play a role in building an integrity culture? How can technology be used in more proactive ways to reduce organisational exposures to legal, compliance and fraud risks? What are the key challenges for legal and compliance departments in this digitally transformative age?

    Philip Bramwell, Group General Counsel, BAE Systems 
    Melissa Myatt, Partner, Forensic & Integrity Services UK, EY
    Elizabeth Robertson, Partner, Government Enforcement and White Collar Crime, Skadden
    Rahul Erik Saxena, Group Ethics and Compliance Officer, BP
    Moderator:
    Jonathan Guthrie, Head of Lex Column, Financial Times

  • 8:10pm
    Closing Remarks

    Jonathan Guthrie, Head of Lex Column, Financial Times

  • 8:15pm
    Buffet & Cocktails
  • 9:15pm
    Event Ends

Presented by: (2)

The Financial Times is one of the world’s leading business news organisations, recognised internationally for its authority, integrity and accuracy. The FT has a record paying readership of one million, three-quarters of which are digital subscriptions. It is part of Nikkei Inc., which provides a broad range of information, news and services for the global business community.

About EY Forensic & Integrity Services

Dealing with complex issues of fraud, regulatory compliance and business disputes can detract from efforts to succeed. Better management of fraud risk and compliance exposure is a critical business priority — no matter the size or industry sector. With approximately 4,500 forensic professionals around the world, we will assemble the right multidisciplinary and culturally aligned team to work with you and your legal advisors. We work to give you the benefit of our broad sector experience, our deep subject-matter knowledge and the latest insights from our work worldwide.

Venue

The Ned
27 Poultry
London EC2R 8AJ
Tel: (0)20 3828 2000

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Contact

Michael D. Imeson
Speaking Opportunities
Senior Content Editor, FT Live