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Enhancing Corporate Integrity

A fresh approach to data integrity, privacy and regulatory compliance

New York |
Speakers include:
Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson

Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson

Financial Times

Overview

In the digital era, companies are increasingly reliant on data and leading edge technologies such as AI, robotic process automation and cloud infrastructure to gain business insights, achieve operational efficiency and seek new growth opportunities. Technology is ultimately programmed and controlled by humans who are prone to errors, whether intentionally or unintentionally. How technology is implemented can be a black box to business owners who do not have the requisite technical know-how, thus presenting a range of risks that can cause significant reputational and financial harm to the business. These risks can be caused by human error, bias, faulty algorithm design, poor quality data or malicious insiders.
Compounding the problem is the increase in data protection and privacy regulations around the world, such as the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation, California’s Consumer Privacy Act and the New York State Department of Financial Services’ cyber security regulations. All of these carry stringent requirements dictating how data should be secured, accessed, stored and used. Non-compliance can be destructive to the business, resulting in hefty fines, reputation damage and disruption to the business. Violations often originate from outside the organization, as Uber discovered to its cost when the Federal Trade Commission took action against it for failing to secure personal information it stored on a third-party cloud provider’s servers.
Privacy and security are also converging as protecting private data is at the core of both. Consent is no longer sufficient to provide the necessary privacy protection. Security measures need to go beyond fencing private data because anyone with access to large amount of data, albeit considered non-private, can gain access to private information with the aid of AI and analytics technologies. Privacy and security risk considerations should be extended to AI and analytics programs.
Besides privacy and security concerns, the use of AI and analytics can run other legal and compliance risks. For example, if a company uses AI in hiring decisions it could inadvertently trigger discrimination laws depending on how it selects personal characteristics as input. It is always important to understand how a decision is arrived at when defending certain positions. However, it is not always easy, or even possible, to trace the decision tree when AI is used. Finally, while machines can be more reliable than humans in many instances, they can fail miserably when encountering unexpected situations.
This FT Roundtable will look at the data integrity risks facing companies today. It will bring together general counsel, chief compliance officers, chief operating officers, chief risk officers, chief data officers and others from various industry sectors to discuss the various risk scenarios and how to manage them.

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fallback Add to my Calendar 04/02/2019 17:45:0004/02/2019 20:30:00falseEnhancing Corporate IntegrityIn the digital era, companies are increasingly reliant on data and leading edge technologies such as AI, robotic process automation and cloud infrastructure to gain business insights, achieve operational efficiency and seek new growth opportunities. Technology is ultimately programmed and controlled by humans who are prone to errors, whether intentionally or unintentionally. How technology is implemented can be a black box to business owners who do not have the requisite technical know-how, thus presenting a range of risks that can cause significant reputational and financial harm to the business. These risks can be caused by human error, bias, faulty algorithm design, poor quality data or malicious insiders.Compounding the problem is the increase in data protection and privacy regulations around the world, such as the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation, California’s Consumer Privacy Act and the New York State Department of Financial Services’ cyber security regulations. All of these carry stringent requirements dictating how data should be secured, accessed, stored and used. Non-compliance can be destructive to the business, resulting in hefty fines, reputation damage and disruption to the business. Violations often originate from outside the organization, as Uber discovered to its cost when the Federal Trade Commission took action against it for failing to secure personal information it stored on a third-party cloud provider’s servers.Privacy and security are also converging as protecting private data is at the core of both. Consent is no longer sufficient to provide the necessary privacy protection. Security measures need to go beyond fencing private data because anyone with access to large amount of data, albeit considered non-private, can gain access to private information with the aid of AI and analytics technologies. Privacy and security risk considerations should be extended to AI and analytics programs.Besides privacy and security concerns, the use of AI and analytics can run other legal and compliance risks. For example, if a company uses AI in hiring decisions it could inadvertently trigger discrimination laws depending on how it selects personal characteristics as input. It is always important to understand how a decision is arrived at when defending certain positions. However, it is not always easy, or even possible, to trace the decision tree when AI is used. Finally, while machines can be more reliable than humans in many instances, they can fail miserably when encountering unexpected situations.This FT Roundtable will look at the data integrity risks facing companies today. It will bring together general counsel, chief compliance officers, chief operating officers, chief risk officers, chief data officers and others from various industry sectors to discuss the various risk scenarios and how to manage them.Enhancing-Corporate-Integrity62f9349aef65ed6e0ba40917701e0852MM/DD/YYYY

Agenda - 2nd Apr

  • 5:45pm
    Guests Arrive and Drinks Served
  • 6:15pm
    Welcome

    Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson, US News Editor, Financial Times

  • 6:25pm
    Opening remarks: What are the causes of data integrity risks in today’s digital world?

    Todd Marlin, Principal, Forensic & Integrity Services - Global and Americas Forensic Data Analytics Leader, Ernst & Young LLP

    Cindy Doe, Principal, Financial Services Office, Ernst & Young LLP

  • 6:35pm
    Roundtable discussion: Enhancing data integrity
  • 7:25pm
    Closing remarks

    Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson, US News Editor, Financial Times

  • 7:30pm
    Buffet and networking drinks
  • 8:30pm
    Event ends

Chair (1)

Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson

Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson

US News Editor
Financial Times

Andrew Edgecliffe-Johnson is the US News Editor for the Financial Times, responsible for coordinating the FT's daily Americas news coverage. He is based in New York.  Previously Mr Edgecliffe-Johnson served as the FT’s Global Media Editor, moving the position from London to New York in July 2008. He led and coordinated the FT’s global coverage of sectors ranging from the music and movie businesses to digital media and marketing, writing about technology and media for the FT’s Inside Business column and managing a team of media, telecoms and consumer industries reporters in the US and Europe.  In his 16 years at the FT, Mr Edgecliffe-Johnson has also been the FT’s Deputy News Editor, edited its management features section (now called Business Life), covered M&A and consumer industries in New York from 1999 to 2002, and written for the influential Lex column. He began his career in journalism as a financial reporter for the Daily Telegraph in London. Mr Edgecliffe-Johnson was the winner of the Newsbios “30 under 30” award for young financial journalists in 2000 and 2001. He has served as a judge for The Shorty Awards and has co-chaired FT Live’s annual Digital Media Conference and Future of Marketing Summit. Mr Edgecliffe-Johnson graduated from Cambridge University with an MA in Italian and French.

Presented by (1)

Financial Times Live (FT Live) is the global conferences and events division of the Financial Times Group. Chaired by senior journalists from the Financial Times Group, the summits, conferences, awards and strategic forums organised by FT Live gather the world’s brightest minds and most influential decision-makers.

Exclusive on-stage interviews, stimulating presentations and lively panel debates – available on multiple content platforms – provide the cutting-edge insights, unique personalities and peer audience engagement that have the power to transform finance, business, politics, society and culture.

The Financial Times is one of the world’s leading business news organisations, recognised internationally for its authority, integrity and accuracy. In 2016 the FT passed a significant milestone in its digital transformation as digital and services revenues overtook print revenues for the first time. The FT has a combined paid print and digital circulation of more than 910,000 and makes 60% of revenues from its journalism.

In Association with (1)

About EY Forensic & Integrity Services

Dealing with complex issues of fraud, regulatory compliance and business disputes can detract from efforts to succeed. Better management of fraud risk and compliance exposure is a critical business priority — no matter the size or industry sector. With approximately 4,500 forensic professionals around the world, we will assemble the right multidisciplinary and culturally aligned team to work with you and your legal advisors. We work to give you the benefit of our broad sector experience, our deep subject-matter knowledge and the latest insights from our work worldwide.

Venue

Andaz 5th Avenue
485 5th Avenue
New York 10017

United States of America

Tel: +1 212 601 1234

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Contact

Ruth Strachan
Content Executive
Financial Times